Travel Medicine Restrictions

An ideal tool to use before your trip, to help you identify if you are carrying your medicine legally.

If your medicine contains a controlled drug, it's listed in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970.

Schedule
1

Contains class A, B & C Drugs

Drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.

Examples: herion, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), 3, 4methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote.

Schedule
2

Contains class A, B & C Drugs

Drugs with a high potential for abuse, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence.

Examples: Combination products with less than 15mg of hydrocodone per dosage (Vicodin), cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), oxycodone.

Schedule
3

Contains class B & C Drugs

Drugs with a moderate to low potential for potential for physical and psychological dependence.

Examples: Products containing less than 90mg of codeine per dosage unit (Tylenol with codeine), ketamine, anabolic steroids, testosterone.

Schedule
4

Contains class B & C Drugs

Drugs with a low potential for abuse and low risk of dependence.

Examples: Xanax, Soma, Darvon, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien, Tramadol.

Schedule
5

Contains class B & C Drugs

Drugs with a very lower potential for abuse and consist of preparations containing limited quantities of certain narcotics.

Examples: cough preparations with less than 200mg of codeine or per 100ml (Robitussin AC), Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica, Parepectolin

Most countries will not let you travel with schedule 1 drugs, whereas it may be possible to carry schedule 2-5 drugs with the right supporting documentation.